Post 348: Frozen Assets

This post has nothing to do with: The Bank of England, Euros, Brexit, Russians, Global Warming, or the phenomena that is Enrique Iglesias. No, this is about possibly props from a science fiction movie that failed to happen. Or a benefit from a retirement home that no one really wanted. Or a way to ease the pain of your child’s first goldfish death.

This is The Future. Returns Accepted within 30 Days of Shipping.

CTI-Cryogenics 9600 Helium Compressor – NEW – £2800 (London)

CTI-Cryogenics 9600 Helium Compressor – NEW IN CRATE – PN 8135900G001

New In Crate, CTI-Cryogenics 9600 (Helium) Compressor

The operation of CTI-CRYOGENICS cryopumps is based upon a closed loop helium expansion cycle. The system is made up of two major components: the cryopump, which contains the cold head, and the helium Compressor which compresses the helium gas. Refrigeration is produced in the cryopump cold head through periodic expansion of high pressure helium in a regenerative process. The high pressure helium is provided by the Compressor. Low pressure helium returning from the cold head is compressed into the necessary high pressure to be returned to the cold head. The energy required to compress the helium is rejected as heat through the cooling water. High pressure room temperature helium is transferred to the cold head through the supply lines. After expansion, low pressure helium is returned to the Compressor (at or near room temperature) to repeat the cycle in a closed loop fashion. Large separation distances can be accommodated between the Compressor and the cryopump. In the Compressor, helium is compressed using a highly reliable oil lubricated commercial Compressor. Helium purification takes place via several stages of oil removal. The final stage of purification is performed with a replaceable adsorber cartridge. In order to maintain peak efficiency, the adsorber must be replaced every three years. Shipping or can be collected. Returns accepted within 30 days of received unit.

So many questions and yet too much information. What’s an adsorber cartridge? Where can I find one? But I don’t need my oil changed, thanks. And I don’t think I would ship that. Ratwoman, you are amazing at finding some unique ads from Sparky’s extended family in London. Thank you !

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4 thoughts on “Post 348: Frozen Assets

  1. What seems to happened is that a bit of techinical equipment has, well, “fallen off a truck.”
    Spark has then done a cut-n-paste from the technical brochure.
    This was not executed with any competence as to what all thosr wirds mean, or why they might be germane. (Not that the hotdam chermans gits anyting to do wit it.)

    What the walk of text describes is the mechanical method of taking a room temperature gas and compressing it into a super-cooled liquid (just physics).

    Since compressors are used, they are oiled to keep the movong parts moving. Oil and super-cool liquids are not a good mix, so oil separation is a good thing.

    As a good thing, the filters use adsorption rather than absorption for filtering.
    The difference being that adsorptant materials filter by creating a chemical or molecular bond of the product being filtered on the filtration plane. The term can be thought of as a portmandeau of adhesion and absorption; allowing that it has been in scientific use since the 1880s.

    This unit is designed to provide super-cooled helium to diagnostic or observational equipment of some kind. Like a PET scanner or the like.

    The probability of a UK Dr Sheldon Cooper needing a helium compressir for their flat is more than passing unlikely.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Also, there’s a frankly worrying amount of medical equipment. I’ve just found a laser lipo machine. And some kind of surgical microscope for ophthalmology, being sold by the owner. How deep do you get into ophthalmology before deciding it’s not for you? Pretty sure it’s usually before you buy the surgical microscope.

    Liked by 1 person

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